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Women's History Month

A guide for finding information about Women's History Month

Recommended Research Guides

Recommended Databases

Immigrant Women Tell Their Stories

Jargon-free, this book documents and analyzes the experience of immigration from the female perspective. It discusses the unique challenges that women face, offers insightsinto the meanings of their experiences, develops gender-sensitive knowledge, about immigration, and discusses implications for the development of services for immigrant women.

Through Women's Eyes

Through Women's Eyes: An American History with Documents was the first text to present a narrative of U.S. women's history within the context of the central developments of the United States and to combine this core narrative with written and visual primary sources in each chapter. The authors' commitment to highlighting the best and most current scholarship, along with their focus on women from a broad range of ethnicities, classes, religions, and regions, has helped students really understand U.S. history Through Women's Eyes. Achieve Read & Practice is now available in dedicated version for this title. Students get the complete accessible, mobile e-book combined with the acclaimed LearningCurve adaptive quizzing--all for just $30 net to the bookstore. Achieve Read & Practice can also be packaged with any bound version of these titles for the price of the book alone--no additional cost.

Unexpected Influence: women who helped shape the early community college movement

In the second half of the 20th century, men and women of uncommon vision and commitment drove the phenomenal growth of that uniquely American institution of higher education, the community college. Students of this movement are well aware of the contributions of the men who served as college presidents, researchers, and national leaders - but what women made significant contributions that have not before been brought to light? Mildred Montag envisioned and implemented community-college based programs to train nurses. Dorothy Knoell used her prodigious research skills to show that community colleges prepare students well to succeed after transfer. Mildred Bulpitt and Carolyn Desjardins helped create and run leadership workshops that resulted in hundreds of women moving up the administrative pipeline. And a dynamic group of women were behind the successful replication of community-based colleges through the establishment of the American Indian tribal colleges. These stories and a dozen more are captured in this book. Those who are familiar with community colleges will welcome having these stories documented at last, and those new to the field will be inspired by how these women came to exert such "unexpected influence" on these remarkable educational institutions.

Legal Empowerment for Women and Disadvantaged Groups

Legal empowerment is a powerful tool for reducing poverty. It gives people the knowledge, skills, and confidence to participate in development projects. It promotes inclusive growth, which reduces poverty by building people s capacity to improve their lives. Inclusive growth is a goal of Strategy 2020, which guides the Asian Development Bank (ADB) in its mission to promote gender equality, empower women, and achieve the Millennium Development Goals. The report presents the findings of a project funded by ADB, carried out by The Asia Foundation, and conducted in Bangladesh, Indonesia, and Pakistan. The project aimed to identify and test legal empowerment strategies that increase access to basic social services, productive resources, and opportunities by women and other disadvantaged groups and to incorporate legal empowerment initiatives into mainstream development project."

California Women and Politics

In 1911 as progressivism moved toward its zenith, the state of California granted women the right to vote. However, women’s political involvement in California’s public life did not begin with suffrage, nor did it end there. nbsp; Across the state, women had been deeply involved in politics long before suffrage, and—although their tactics and objectives changed—they remained deeply involved thereafter. California Women and Politics examines the wide array of women’s public activism from the 1850s to 1929—including the temperance movement, moral reform, conservation,nbsp;trade unionism, settlement work, philanthropy, wartime volunteerism, and more—and reveals unexpected contours to women’s politics in California. The contributors consider not only white middle-class women’s organizing but also the politics of working-class women and women of color, emphasizing that there was not one monolithic “women’s agenda,” but rather a multiplicity of women’s voices demanding recognition for a variety of causes.

Transformations: Women, Gender and Psychology, 3rd ed.

Transformations: Women, Gender and Psychology, 3rd Edition examines the latest research in the context of a retrograde political climate on such topics as women's leadership, backlash against competent women, sexual harassment, transgender identity, reproductive justice, and feminist activism. Students are introduced to the concepts of feminism, multiculturalism, diversity and intersexuality.

Unbroken Thread: An Anthology of Plays by Asian American Women

This book contains plays by Genny Lim (Paper Angels,) Wakako Yamauchi (The MusicLessons,) Momoko Iko (Gold Watch,) Velina Hasu Houston (Tea,) Jeannie Barroga (Walls,) and Elizabeth Wong (Letters to a Student Revolutionary.) The volume includes an extended introduction, a profile of each playwright, and an appendix. The six plays of this anthology represent some of the best dramatic literature written by Asian American women since the 1970s. Each is a groundbreaking work and addresses in its own way the experiences of Asians in America. All six playwrights are American-born daughters of Asian immigrants, and their voices span the genres of naturalism, impressionism, ritual drama, postmodern collage, and media-influenced episodic drama.

Hood Feminism: Notes From the Women That a Movement Forgot

Mainstream feminists rarely talk about meeting basic needs as a feminist issue, argues Mikki Kendall, but food insecurity, access to quality education, safe neighborhoods, a living wage, and medical care are all feminist issues. All too often, however, the focus is not on basic survival for the many, but on increasing privilege for the few. That feminists refuse to prioritize these issues has only exacerbated the age-old problem of both internecine discord and women who rebuff at carrying the title. Moreover, prominent white feminists broadly suffer from their own myopia with regard to how things like race, class, sexual orientation, and ability intersect with gender. How can we stand in solidarity as a movement, Kendall asks, when there is the distinct likelihood that some women are oppressing others? In her searing collection of essays, Mikki Kendall takes aim at the legitimacy of the modern feminist movement, arguing that it has chronically failed to address the needs of all but a few women.

White Women, Race Matters: The Social Construction of Whiteness

Traditional debates concerning racially hierarchical societies have tended to focus on the experience of being black. White Women, Race Matters breaks with this tradition by focusing on the particular experiences of white women in a racially hierarchical society. By considering the ways in which their experience not only contributes to but challenges the reproduction of racism, the work offers a rigorous examination of existing methodologies, practices and assumptions concerning racism and gender relations.

Black Women's Liberatory Pedagogies

This interdisciplinary anthology sheds light on the frameworks and lived experiences of Black women educators. Contributors for this anthology submitted works from an array of academic disciplines and learning environments, inviting readers to bear witness to black women faculty's classroom experiences, as well as their pedagogical approaches both inside and outside of the higher education classroom that have fostered transformative teaching-learning environments. Through this multidimensional lens, the editors and contributors view instruction and learning as a political endeavor aimed at changing the way we think about teaching, learning. and praxis.